Get 15x the Protection Against Viruses

During the 2014 SARS outbreak, a specific chemical helped treat some of the most severe cases of the virus.

Now, international researchers are currently conducting trials to see if this chemical’s antiviral properties can help treat COVID-19 patients.

This chemical is nitric oxide (NO)—a neurotransmitter naturally produced by the body. And one of its most critical roles is to help fortify the immune system so that it can better fight off viruses and infections.

While research is still ongoing in regards to its potential against coronavirus specifically, previous studies show that increasing NO levels offers dozens of health benefits. But what may be most intriguing about NO is that you can easily produce more of it on your own—and reap its numerous benefits… without visiting a doctor, filling a prescription, swallowing a pill, or paying a single cent.

All you need is the power of sound.

I’ll tell you how in just a moment. But first, let me tell you a little bit more about this vital molecule and how it works.

The potent “life molecule”

NO plays an essential role in nearly every cellular and organ function in the body, hence its nickname: the “life molecule.”

Among its many functions, nitric oxide plays a major role in relaxing your blood vessels—keeping them healthy and open, promoting effortless blood flow. This not only keeps your blood pressure in check, but also supplies more oxygen and nutrients to your cells, helping them to better remove toxins and waste.

NO also has an antiviral effect in the immune system. Whenever a threat is present, your immune system’s white blood cells attack the bacteria, virus, or fungi—releasing a fatal shot of NO to destroy the invaders.

NO’s effectiveness in fighting SARS

As I mentioned above, researchers are particularly interested in studying NO to battle COVID-19, after noting its effectiveness in treating SARS. Studies showed that it:

  • Improved severe hypoxia (oxygen deprivation of bodily tissue)
  • Reversed pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs)
  • Shortened the amount of time patients needed to be on ventilators

Dr. Lou Ignarro, Ph.D., won the Nobel Prize for his research on NO and SARS. He explains, “Inhaled nitric oxide dilates or widens arteries to allow more blood flow through the lungs. It also relaxes the trachea and bronchioles, allowing more air to come in.”

Because of this positive effect on respiratory health and function, multiple clinical trials are currently studying NO in COVID-19 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital, Louisiana State University Health Shreveport, and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

I’ll be sure to keep you updated as the results of the trials become available.

In the meantime, I’ll tell you how you can generate your own protective supply of nitric oxide to strengthen your respiratory and immune health.

The secret soldier in your sinuses

One way to increase your supply of NO is something you’re already doing: Breathing in and out through your nose. The simple act of exhaling triggers the production of NO.

But I recently came across some research that shines a light on an even more powerful way to boost your NO levels.

A 2002 study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine compared the amount of NO produced via humming vs the amount generated from exhalation.

Researchers found that humming produced 15 times more NO than breathing through the nose.

IMAGE SOURCE: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Additionally, the researchers noted that humming promoted clearer sinus passageways. They concluded that daily humming may reduce the risk for sinus infections, especially in people susceptible to upper airway infections.

Boost NO for better protection, starting today

Here’s a specific humming exercise you can use to boost your own NO production. It’s based on a 6,000 year-old exercise from India called Bhramari Pranayama—also known as the “humming bee breath”:

  1. Get into a comfortable sitting position and close your eyes.

  2. With your mouth closed, slowly inhale through your nose.

  3. Lift your elbows to shoulder level and bring your hands to your ears. Your palms should be facing you.

  4. Using your thumbs, plug your ears by pushing your tragus inward (the hard cartilage separating your ears from your face). This will help self-generated vibrations work on a deeper level throughout your body.

  5. Use the rest of your hands to cover your eyes. Your pointer finger should rest above your eyebrow, and your three remaining fingers should gently sit over your eyelids.

  6. Then exhale through your nose and simultaneously hum. Your lips should stay closed and your hum should laugh the full duration of your exhalation. (I created an example for you here!)

  7. Continue inhaling, exhaling, and humming for two full minutes. And remember, stop immediately and take a break if you feel dizzy.

Notice how much easier it is to breathe and how much calmer you feel.

I recommend adding this practice to your daily routine in order to maintain the results. Feel free to increase the duration or frequency for added protection.

As a target goal, see if you can gradually work your way up to doing Bhramari Pranayama for 15 minutes, twice a day. (This is the “dose” many studies have found to be most effective.)

In addition to the benefits of increased nitric oxide, sound healing exercises like the humming bee breath also help to strengthen your vagal tone—improving your resilience to stress and restoring balance throughout your entire body.

And in these uncertain times, it’s important to take as many preventative steps as you can.

Remember, your body’s built-in healing tools can often work better than anything money can buy… It’s just a matter of knowing how to use them.

To learn more about naturally producing NO and other beneficial body chemicals, check out my Whole Body Sound Healing System. I cover this in depth in Lesson 8: “How to Make ‘Feel Good Chemicals’ Using Sound.” Simply click here to learn more or give it a try today.


SOURCES:

Cennimo, D. et al. (2020). What is the role of nitric oxide in the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)? Medscape. Retrieved from: medscape.com/answers/2500114-197460/what-is-the-role-of-nitric-oxide-in-the-treatment-of-coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19

Luiking, Y., Engelen, M., and Deutz, N. (2011). Regulation of nitric oxide production in health and disease. Current Opinions in Clinical Nutritional Metabolic Care. 13(1): pp. 97 – 104. Retrieved from: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2953417/

Mehta, D., Ashkar, A., and Mossman, K. (2012). The Nitric Oxide Pathway Provides Innate Antiviral Protection in Conjunction with the Type I Interferon Pathway in Fibroblasts. PLoS One. 7(2): p. e31688. Retrieved from: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3283670/

Miller, J. (2020). Evidence mounts supporting inhaled nitric oxide as COVID-19 treatment. Healio.com. Retrieved from: healio.com/primary-care/infectious-

Nitric Oxide. Wikipedia. Retrieved from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitric_oxide#Biological_functions

Pope, A., (2020). UAB among first in the U.S. to offer clinical trial for the treatment of patients with severe COVID-19 using nitric oxide. The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Retrieved from: uab.edu/news/research/item/11223-uab-among-first-in-the-u-s-to-offer-clinical-trial-for-the-treatment-of-patients-with-severe-covid-19-using-nitric-oxide

Weitzberg, E., and Lundberg, J. (2002). Humming Greatly Increases Nasal Nitric Oxide. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 166(2). Retrieved from: atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/rccm.200202-138BC

Xijing Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Fondazioine IRCCS Ca’ Granda, Ospdedale Maggiore Policlinico. (2020). Nitric Oxide Gas Inhalation for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in COVID-19. (NOSARSCOVID). ClinicalTrails.gov. Retrieved from: healio.com/news/primary-care/20200520/evidence-mounts-supporting-inhaled-nitric-oxide-as-covid19-treatment

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About the author

Jim Donovan M.Ed., is a professional musician and educator. He's an Assistant Professor at Saint Francis University where he teaches music and how the power of sound can help you experience a healthier life.